We decided to make a video and write a part of it. (the second file I upload) please finish the rest part of it Carto

We decided to make a video and write a part of it. (the second file I upload) please finish the rest part of it

Cartoons & Sales Pitches

You have been assigned to a group, and your group must work together to produce something that will help to protect children. Children grow up with cartoons and fantasy. We take them to Disneyland and introduce them to Mickey Mouse, we sit them in front of a television to keep them occupied while we try to get work done, we teach them to read by giving them comic books, and we let them play video games where fictional characters save the planet. Kids are surrounded by fantasy, and we hope it will help them to dream big. But advertisers know that kids reside in their own fantasy worlds, and some advertisers take advantage of this by using cartoon characters, avatars, and other aspects of fantasy to sell products to those young and impressionable consumers.

Purpose

Your group must design instructional material (poster, brochure, video, or any other form of ad) targeted at the parents of grade school students. It must teach them about the fact that cartoon characters and other appeals derived from children’s entertainment are being used to reach kids, and young children might not fully understand where entertainment ends and advertising begins, nor might they understand the true nature of advertising. You should provide examples that will help parents understand. Remember, it is supposed to speak to parents. It must be capable of teaching them about these dangers of advertising, and provide some direction for how parents should protect their children.

Breadth

There is no way you can do everything in the context of this assignment, so you are only required to cover what you consider the most important issues. Any issue that clearly affects children’s “advertising literacy” can be used. The choices are yours.

Limitation

While you must teach parents about the dangers of cartoon/fantasy based advertising, you must do so without demonizing advertising. Don’t make them feel that advertising is inherently bad or evil.

Format

The format is largely up to you, as well. It can be a film, a website, a research paper, an advertisement, a piece of art, or anything that will effectively communicate the lesson you have chosen to teach. It must be in a form that you can deposit in the “Assignment Folder” on D2L as a single item per group (i.e., don’t give me multiple files). If you are using something like a promotional product, since you can’t slip most products into a virtual mailbox, do a drawing or clip some art that will help you explain to us what you envision. If you have questions about the approach you have in mind, please don’t hesitate to ask me or the TA. Remember that we can only give you a grade based on what you’ve communicated clearly to us. However, you must clearly list your GROUP NUMBER and the names of each GROUP MEMBER on the submission.

Grading Criteria

The group project will be scored on 1) potential effectiveness as an instructional piece, 2) the probability that it could really be used (i.e., is it realistic for use), 3) the amount of thought that went into it, 4) the amount of work that went into it, 5) the “originality” of the work, 6) the clarity (i.e., is it easy to understand and follow, and whether you provided any supporting information to convince us of what you are trying to achieve with your concept), and 7) how “polished” it is (i.e., does it need more work to be presentable?). And, of course, woven through all those criteria is whether or not you followed directions. Each student’s grade will be adjusted based on their peer evaluations, so it is possible to receive a grade that is higher or lower than the group project score. Failure to submit a properly completed peer evaluation by the deadline will result in a loss of points.


Cartoons & Sales Pitches
You have been assigned to a group, and your group must work together to produce something
that will help to protect children. Children grow up with cartoons and fantasy. We take them to
Disneyland and introduce them to Mickey Mouse, we sit them in front of a television to keep
them occupied while we try to get work done, we teach them to read by giving them comic
books, and we let them play video games where fictional characters save the planet. Kids are
surrounded by fantasy, and we hope it will help them to dream big. But advertisers know that
kids reside in their own fantasy worlds, and some advertisers take advantage of this by using
cartoon characters, avatars, and other aspects of fantasy to sell products to those young and
impressionable consumers.
Purpose
Your group must design instructional material (poster, brochure, video, or any other form of
ad) targeted at the parents of grade school students. It must teach them about the fact that
cartoon characters and other appeals derived from children’s entertainment are being used
to reach kids, and young children might not fully understand where entertainment ends and
advertising begins, nor might they understand the true nature of advertising. You should
provide examples that will help parents understand. Remember, it is supposed to speak to
parents. It must be capable of teaching them about these dangers of advertising, and provide
some direction for how parents should protect their children.
Breadth
There is no way you can do everything in the context of this assignment, so you are only
required to cover what you consider the most important issues. Any issue that clearly affects
children’s “advertising literacy” can be used. The choices are yours.
Limitation
While you must teach parents about the dangers of cartoon/fantasy based advertising, you must
do so without demonizing advertising. Don’t make them feel that advertising is inherently bad or
evil.
Format
The format is largely up to you, as well. It can be a film, a website, a research paper, an
advertisement, a piece of art, or anything that will effectively communicate the lesson you
have chosen to teach. It must be in a form that you can deposit in the “Assignment Folder” on
D2L as a single item per group (i.e., don’t give me multiple files). If you are using something like
a promotional product, since you can’t slip most products into a virtual mailbox, do a drawing or
clip some art that will help you explain to us what you envision. If you have questions about the
approach you have in mind, please don’t hesitate to ask me or the TA. Remember that we can
only give you a grade based on what you’ve communicated clearly to us. However, you must
clearly list your GROUP NUMBER and the names of each GROUP MEMBER on the
submission.
Grading Criteria
The group project will be scored on 1) potential effectiveness as an instructional piece, 2) the
probability that it could really be used (i.e., is it realistic for use), 3) the amount of thought that
went into it, 4) the amount of work that went into it, 5) the “originality” of the work, 6) the clarity
(i.e., is it easy to understand and follow, and whether you provided any supporting information
to convince us of what you are trying to achieve with your concept), and 7) how “polished”
it is (i.e., does it need more work to be presentable?). And, of course, woven through all those
criteria is whether or not you followed directions. Each student’s grade will be adjusted based on
their peer evaluations, so it is possible to receive a grade that is higher or lower than the group
project score. Failure to submit a properly completed peer evaluation by the deadline will result
in a loss of points.
Important Note: this assignment is worth 20% of your grade, and 20% of the grade of each of
your teammates. If there are 5 people in your team that means all together (20% x 5) this
assignment is equal to one person’s total effort for the class, for an entire semester. Since a 3credit class is supposed to take about 150 hours of your time during the semester, look at your
project before you hand it in and ask yourselves whether it looks like 150 hours went into it. I
don’t really expect quite that much effort put into it, but keep in mind that some projects look
closer to that standard than others. When grading these assignments, we look at how much
work appears to have gone into them! HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO REMEMBER: If other
groups seem to have done twice as much work, you can expect that your score will be less than
theirs.
Final Caution
Of course, scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated. After all, this is a class that is about ethics
and honesty, so be sure that you don’t copy someone else’s work.
Peer Evaluation
You must evaluate your fellow team members. You are expected to do so fairly, but that does
not mean giving them a better grade than they deserve. You are my eyes and ears in your
group. You might not like the way I require you to distribute scores, but there is a reason why it
is done this way, and it still leaves you a lot of flexibility. The Peer Evaluations are due 4
weekdays after the deadline of the project, also by noon.
Deadline
The project must be deposited in the D2L dropbox no later than Noon on February 28. [Note, it
can be deposited at any time prior to that.]
Script:
Using info from: https://raisingchildren.net.au/toddlers/play-learning/screen-timemedia/advertising-children
Beginning of Video:
Kids ages and what they know
Middle of Video:
Show examples and techniques they use to target kids
End of Video:
Strategies to spot it
Script:
(opening)
Where does entertainment ends and advertising begin? For kids, it can be hard to tell.
In this video, we will cover how advertising affects children at different ages, examples of
advertisements using cartoon characters and children entertainment to reach kids, and
techniques to help your children find the difference.
In short, this video will teach advertising literacy.
(part 1)
Until children are 3 years old, they can’t tell the difference between advertisements and actual
programs.
From ages 3-6, children can tell the difference from ads and programs. However, they don’t
understand that ads are trying to sell something and tend to think of advertisements as
entertaining or announcements.
At age 7-11, children can understand that ads are trying to sell something, and often time can
remember advertising messages. They can recognize some advertising techniques such as
overstating how good products are. However, they might not always understand that products
aren’t as good as they say they are or fully understand what the advertisements are doing.
(part 2)
Here are a few examples of advertising literacy:
(part 3)
Some strategies are…

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