This role play will be about an interview with the client mentioned in the case scenario. Word limit will be

This role play will be about an interview with the client mentioned in the case scenario. Word limit will be

Question:

This role play will be about an interview with the client mentioned in the case scenario. Word limit will be around 500 words. Please make sure to cover the following points. In your role playas, you should include the following sections: Greetings & building trustGreetings confirm the name, and introduce yourself – community service worker who is going to support them, show your excitement of working with them, show your passion for caringAsk the client whether they feel comfortable about the room, points to cover include: physical contact, personal space, positioning of chair and table, feeling too cold or hot, physical discomfort, room too noisy? Room too quiet? (a white noise machine may make them feel more comfortable and less concerned about their privacy)ask them to feel free to use amenities at your facility, for example, snacks, drinks, sofa, funny books, card sets, comic books – make sure to distract them if they are too nervous)ask basic information (name, age, religion, preference for food) Recognize the person’s strengths (avoid all possible triggers)Acknowledge that they are good at studying, and that is important for a student.Ask about his dreams and hobbies. (show your interest in their hobbies and dreams, and have some casual talks on that topic; for example, if they are interested in cricket, then talk about some recent matches, if they are interested in video games, then try talking about some popular games among kids) Ask them about their expectation about this meeting:Firstly, ask them if they chose to come to this meeting or if they were told to come by someone else.Reassuring them that the meeting would help if they did not make the choice, and if they came here voluntarily, acknowledge that this is the right move.To notify some topics may not be easy but reassure them that no one is allowed to harm them, and everything they say to you is between you and them and other helpers – you will ask for their permission if you are to tell anyone else, including his parents.tell them about the grounding techniques, and practice some of them before you go ahead(for example, choose one broad category, such as “musical instruments” and “ice-cream flavors”, and mentally list as many things from each category as he can;Or prepare a small bucket of water, and tell him to put his hands in water, focus on the water’s temperature and how it feels on his fingertips, palms, and the backs of his hands. You can use warm water first, then cold. Next, try cold water first, then warm. Ask him to feel the difference between switching from cold to warm water versus warm to cold.https://www.healthline.com/health/grounding-techniques#physical-techniques You can find more useful grounding techniques on this page) Identify the impact of the trauma on the person’s mental health developmentAsk them if they have understood the grounding techniques because these will be useful later in the meeting. (this will also give them a hint that you are moving to the difficult topics)Set out the boundaries, and tell them politely that aggressive behavior is not acceptable.Make sure to focus only on the impacts rather than going into very detailed traumatic topics here, that is, do not mention anything like “physical abuse”, “stepmother”, or “boarding school” in this section.Discuss the two following topics to see if it is necessary for them to take an assessment later on:Be sure to use language that children can understand, for example:When asking about PTSD, you should ask “Do you sometimes have sleeping difficulties? Were there some nightmares that remind you of some unhappy things?Have you felt overwhelmed by some daydreams that remind you of some unhappy things?Do you feel you do not care about your friends and teachers?Have the idea of hurting yourself intentionally come to you before?Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)Severe traumatic events such as violence, sexual assault, torture, or abuse can cause post-traumatic stress disorder. The main symptoms are getting vivid flashbacks to the event in which the person believes they are actually re-experiencing it. They may feel constantly in danger, causing them to be hyper-vigilant, on edge or liable to respond unpredictably.PTSD is considered an anxiety disorder. Complex PTSD (caused by severe, repeated, or purposefully cruel events) may not develop for years after the event. Alternatively, it may take years for the symptoms to be fully recognized and addressed. Self-harmSelf-harm is the use of pain to allow a person to cope with the circumstances, such as trauma. In generally, people who selfharm do not intend to kill themselves, but tend to use it distract themselves from painful thoughts, as a release or as a punishment. It tends to begin in adolescence or early adulthood. There is a high correlation between people who self-harm and those who have been abused in childhood. It has been theorised that self-harm may be a re-enactment of physical and emotional pain the person suffered during the traumatic event. People who feel particularly numb or dissociated from life may use it to feel something, even if it is pain. By contrast, suicidality is the act of considering or planning to take the person’s own life due to pressures they can’t handle. This could be due to PTSD and other symptoms decreasing their quality of life to the point where they feel they are unable to enjoy it. The very act of being suicidal can be traumatic, creating a self-destructive cycle.If according to their answers, they have PTSD issues and/or self-harm issues, then you should tell them that “there will be some assessments/questionnaires on that/those topic(s) after this meeting. (According to the case scenario, they will at least have PTSD issues) Identify any triggers or flashbacks that person facesLet them tell you about one of their “daydreams” that made them feel stressed, what was in that dream, one thing at a time.They start to have some slight flashback when you mention one object in a normal household, for example, newspaper roll, because his stepmother used to hit him with it. They will start to act aggressive.(Other options for triggers)Sights and soundsPeople and places associated with traumatic eventsNews about the person/eventDreams or nightmares.Use the grounding techniques you practiced before to calm Peter down.Address their aggressive behaviour, tell them calmly that that is not acceptable, and but do not use judgemental language like “you are terrible”, “you shouldn’t have done that”, instead, you should say something like “you are a good student, you are a good story teller, but that behaviour is not acceptable.” Discuss with Peter about the possible treatment options/strategies that he can employ himself that will help him.Use the colour coded information to write this part:Be sure to use language that children can understand, for example:Have you had someone at school that make you feel comfortable and relaxed around? Does doing some after-school extra-curriculum activities like swimming club sound interesting to you?Do you have any religious belief?Do you want to learn about some techniques that can help you control your temper?Give them at least two options on the treatments, conduct your own research and find out the benefits and risks of that treatment, inform Peter of these points and let them choose from the options. Tell him that he needs to see a psychologist/psychiatrist.Recommend 2 trainings suitable for them and let them choose 1. The colour coding for the following information:Strategies – the clients can employ these strategies on their ownTreatments – therapy that requires the involvement of health professionalsTrainings – trainings that Peter can receive toBeliefThe client’s personal beliefs can enable them to put their experiences into context and help themmanage trauma. Their beliefs may be personal, religious, spiritual or political. If the beliefs give the client strength, you shouldn’t challenge them, even if you don’t believe in them. This is known as acceptance in counselling. You may be able to incorporate the beliefs into the client’s treatment. If the beliefs are cultural-specific, you should make efforts to find out more about them so you can provide the client with better treatment.Supportive relationshipsSupportive relationships are important in helping people deal with and overcome the effects of trauma. Their network (which may include parents, children, partners, friends and other family) may provide them with emotional and physical support which can help them deal with the impact of trauma.Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR)EMDR uses eye movements and sounds to reprocess memories. It establishes new connections in the brain to view the event as a normal memory, rather than reliving it in the present. During the process, clients identify how the traumatic event affects their view of themselves (e.g. not in control, weak, vulnerable.) They then identify how they feel about the event and where the feeling is ‘located’ in the body, such as tightness in the chest. Next, the counsellor moves an object steadily from side to side as the client follows it in their eyes, stimulating both sides of the brain, while the client continues to think about the event. This is known as bilateral stimulation and is not a form of hypnosis. Eventually, the client should be able to process the event in a calmer, more rational way.Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)The purpose of cognitive behavioural therapy is to challenge thoughts and beliefs that have led to action and have been reinforced through years of repetition. This therapy sees problems as inappropriate patterns of behaviour that can be learned and unlearned. It doesn’t remove problems, but can give a person the tools to confront them more positively. It is conducted mainly through talking over several sessions, although takes a shorter amount of time than most counselling therapies. Trainings that are possibly helpfulAssertiveness training: To help clients make decisions for themselves and resist social pressuresAnger/aggression management training: To help clients manage their anger and emotional responsesCoping and problem solving training: To enable clients to deal with stressful situations without destructive behaviour (e.g. alcohol or drugs)Motivational enhancement: To create the desire for change in clientsContingency management: To reinforce positive behaviours by the clientEmotional regulation: To allow people to manage their emotions and express them appropriately for the situation. Dialectic behavioural therapy (DBT)Dialectical behaviour therapy was developed to treat people with strong suicidal urges, but can also be applied to other self-destructive behaviours including responses to trauma. The therapy suggests that some people are more prone to reacting in intense ways during emotional situations. It aims to empower the person to change their behaviour through a range of counselling techniques. Dialectic refers to the combination of two opposite concepts: accepting the person as they are and encouraging change. Therefore, the therapy avoids criticising the client (especially if they are in a vulnerable place) whilst also prompting them to change. Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT)Parent-child interaction therapy is used to manage trauma in abused and vulnerable children. Thecounsellor provides advice as the parent interacts with the child, teaching them effective parentingtechniques. This enables them to build a better relationship, which in turn reduces the child’sbehavioural problems and the parent’s distress. Address the practical aspects for the strategies/trainings/treatmentsWhen, where, with whom these activities will happen, based on your script in previous parts.Will refer him to psychologist/psychiatrist that is outside your organisation.Will contact training facilities/sports clubs/hobby groups for them, and arrange the time and transport (optional, depending whether you think your facility is capable of arranging transport services) for him. Arrange another meeting, and encourage them to work together with you. (The following requirements are for your information only, you do not need to paraphrase them, please stick to my guidelines above)In your role play, you must address the following requirements: Apply practice based on trauma-informed care principles and perspectivePrinciples:SafetySafety means the person feels physically and psychologically safe; they know their wellbeing won’t come to harm in that place and they don’t fear abuse. This is a key aspect as trauma breaks this sense of safety and can leave a client feeling threatened in everyday situations when they wouldn’t otherwise. A safe space is one in which the client feels free to be themselves and they can say how they truly feel.(physical contact, personal space, positioning of chair) Effective two-way communication can make the client feel validated, increasing their sense of safety. the environment should be private, peaceful, comfortable and meet all the client’s other needs.TrustDuring the therapy, the client should learn how to trust again, which starts with the counsellors. The person should trust that the staff have their welfare in mindChoice & ControlDecisions that are being made should be clearly explained to the client and not ‘hidden away’ secretively. Furthermore, the client should have confidence that the worker won’t reveal any of their information without explicit consent; this feeling of confidentiality is important to help them open up.The person can experience a sense of control by being empowered in all treatments. This could be implemented by being given choice over how treatments are implemented. Their opinions should be valued and taken into account during all stages. This also applies to their environment; if necessary, the counsellor should change aspects of it to meet the client’s needs. They should feel able to express theirneeds and exercise their control. Use effective communication strategies and be culturally and age-sensitiveYou may have to modify your communication strategy to take into account the client’s age, particularly if they are young. This is very important in this case because the client is young. Emphasis on non-judgemental, compassionate responses to disclosures of past and current trauma or abuseYour response will be very important in their care. You should be sensitive regarding what you say and how you act.Empathy is the concept of respecting and seeking to understand the client. You should continue to demonstrate it and show that your views of the client are unchanged by disclosures.Note that empathy is different from sympathy, which is pity or feeling sorry for the person. This may be counterproductive to their care. Validate the emotional reactions of the person that signifies the understanding of the impacts of trauma.Validate the person’s experience by saying you understand what they have gone through. Remember to remain non-judgemental which means not making moral judgments about their situation (e.g. “You shouldn’t have done that”) and trying to understand what they are thinking and feeling. Non-judgemental listening is the ability to hear the person and understand the meaning conveyed by both their words and non-verbal behavior. This behavior should encourage clients to talk freely andcomfortably.Recognize the person’s strengths and resilienceYou should work with the client to identify strengths and other aspects that will allow them to deal with trauma. Resilience is the ability to accept what has happened and move on. The more a person exercises resilience, the fewer signs of trauma they show.The strength-based practice utilizes the skills, knowledge, resilience, and resources of people in order to deal with trauma. It involves working collaboratively with the client and enabling them to confront challenges themselves; this way, clients don’t passively consume support but become an active part in creating it, which gives them a greater sense of control.The factors that can increase resilience in children include:Early exposure to loss (his mother died when he was five)Positive attitude of caregivers (After this whole incident, Peter father called him back home and started spending more time with him by going out together fishing and doing the activities which he liked.)Early schooling (he was sent to the boarding school very early)Acceptance in the community (Miss Alex, his teacher and neighbour cares about him)Sense of being special from the caregiver (father’s care and love)Quick return to normal routines after trauma. Identify the impact of the trauma on the person mental health development(Peter is good at his studies, but after all incidents, he has intense mistrust that made him physically aggressive and verbally abusive towards the teacher and students in the school.)o PTSDo AOD issueso depressiono self-harmo learned helplessness  Identify any triggers or flashbacks that person faces(possible ones)Sights and soundsPeople and places associated with traumatic eventsNews about the person/eventDreams or nightmares. Determine the potential for and causes of re-traumatisation, in particular in accessing or receiving servicesClient is most likely to become re-traumatised when they are overwhelmed by topics being discussed which may trigger flashbacks. To avoid this, make sure the treatment doesn’t occur faster than the client is comfortable and able to deal with. You should control the intensity of traumatic materials that are used during counselling sessions. The intensity of materials can be divided into:Level One: The client shows little emotion; their verbal and non-verbal behaviour are calm and don’t match the material.Level Two: The client shows some emotion but isn’t out of control or overwhelmed. Their behaviour matches the content, but they aren’t experiencing flashbacksLevel Three: The client shows extreme emotion as though they are re-experiencing the trauma. They may cry or have trouble breathing. Identify and address barriers in the trauma care processRe-traumatisation:thinking and speaking about traumatic events can re-traumatise a person, there isalso the opportunity for this while completing documentation or implementing the organisation’s policies.Changing counsellors unexpectedlyAsking for information about traumatic eventsMaking it difficult to access helpJudgemental attitudesImposing rules rather than guidelines. Assist consumers in identifying their issues and preferred options to manage the impact of traumatalking about the pros and cons of eachgiving the client time to think it overasking the client to describe their ideal treatment or servicefocusing on the client’s priorities. Develop different strategies to cope with and manage the impact of trauma by identifying the person-specific needsBeliefThe client’s personal beliefs can enable them to put their experiences into context and help themmanage trauma. Their beliefs may be personal, religious, spiritual or political. If the beliefs give the client strength, you shouldn’t challenge them, even if you don’t believe in them. This is known as acceptance in counselling. You may be able to incorporate the beliefs into the client’s treatment. If the beliefs are cultural-specific, you should make efforts to find out more about them so you can provide the client with better treatment.Supportive relationshipsSupportive relationships are important in helping people deal with and overcome the effects of trauma. Their network (which may include parents, children, partners, friends, and other family) may provide them with emotional and physical support that can help them deal with the impact of trauma.Somatic experienceThe somatic experience seeks to manage the symptoms of trauma by focusing on bodily functions rather than the traumatic thoughts and memories. It is based on the principle that animals can undergo similar stress or trauma and discharge the fight-or-flight energy when it isn’t needed. The client is exposed to small amounts of traumatic experience and their physical responses are measured; these may include feelings of dizziness, weight or tightness in the body. Over time, the client uses self-regulating measures to build up a tolerance to the material without being re-traumatized. One key measure is the ability to alternate or ‘pendulate’ between sensations of trauma and sensations of safety. Experiencing these sensations in a controlled way allows the client to process them, discharging feelings of trauma.Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)EMDR uses eye movements and sounds to reprocess memories. It establishes new connections in the brain to view the event as a normal memory, rather than reliving it in the present. During the process, clients identify how the traumatic event affects their view of themselves (e.g. not in control, weak, vulnerable.) They then identify how they feel about the event and where the feeling is ‘located’ in the body, such as tightness in the chest. Next, the counsellor moves an object steadily from side to side as the client follows it in their eyes, stimulating both sides of the brain, while the client continues to think about the event. This is known as bilateral stimulation and is not a form of hypnosis. Eventually, the client should be able to process the event in a calmer, more rational way.Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)The purpose of cognitive behavioral therapy is to challenge thoughts and beliefs that have led to action and have been reinforced through years of repetition. This therapy sees problems as inappropriate patterns of behavior that can be learned and unlearned. It doesn’t remove problems but can give a person the tools to confront them more positively. It is conducted mainly through talking over several sessions, although takes a shorter amount of time than most counseling therapies. Trainings that are possibly helpfulAssertiveness training: To help clients make decisions for themselves and resist social pressuresAnger/aggression management training: To help clients manage their anger and emotional responsesCoping and problem-solving training: To enable clients to deal with stressful situations without destructive behavior (e.g. alcohol or drugs)Motivational enhancement: To create the desire for change in clientsContingency management: To reinforce positive behaviors by the clientEmotional regulation: To allow people to manage their emotions and express them appropriately for the situation.Dialectic behavioral therapy (DBT)Dialectical behavior therapy was developed to treat people with strong suicidal urges, but can also be applied to other self-destructive behaviors including responses to trauma. The therapy suggests that some people are more prone to reacting in intense ways during emotional situations. It aims to empower the person to change their behavior through a range of counseling techniques. Dialectic refers to the combination of two opposite concepts: accepting the person as they are and encouraging change. Therefore, the therapy avoids criticizing the client (especially if they are in a vulnerable place) whilst also prompting them to change. Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT)Parent-child interaction therapy is used to manage trauma in abused and vulnerable children. Thecounsellor provides advice as the parent interacts with the child, teaching them effective parentingtechniques. This enables them to build a better relationship, which in turn reduces the child’sbehavioural problems and the parent’s distress. Determine the capability of the service to respond to people’s trauma issuesYou should determine whether your organisation is able to fulfil the person’s needs. This will depend on several factors, including your experience and knowledge, the organisation’s policies and procedures and the severity of the person’s needs. You may need to consult with other people in your organisation in order to determine whether you are capable of meeting them.If the person has co-existing issues, such as AOD issues, physical health problems caused by the traumatic event or mental illnesses, you may need to consult with other professional services. They will be able to provide more appropriate, specialised care. Obtain consent from the customer to share information with the specialistInformed consent Develop individual support plans by integrating the impact of trauma

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As a community service worker I will conduct a role play
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