research report that discusses the past, present, and future implications of our online identities as you respond to the essential

research report that discusses the past, present, and future implications of our online identities as you respond to the essential

Question:

research report that discusses the past, present, and future implications of our online identities as you respond to the essential question.  Examine the effects of social media on identity whether it’s personal, social, or cultural and discuss whether it’s possible to create and maintain an authentic identity on the internet. ESSENTIAL QUESTION:  Is it possible to create and maintain an authentic online identity?Research the given topic so that you become an expert on it.  Incorporate statistics and data.an MLA-cited list that will be turned in with your final product.Develop a research report that uses clear headings, a visual aid, and formal structure to communicate a response to the question.The headings should follow a parallel format/structure.The project should include:a visual aid in the form of a chart or grapha heading for each new section of the reportMLA formatting – includes in-text citation and a Works Cited Listformal tone and mature vocabulary
Can you please do a research report of around 1500 words that uses in-text citations, headings, and analysis of research to clearly communicate a response to the essential question?  The report is formatted with a clear introduction, main body paragraphs, and a conclusion.   A relevant visual aid in the form of a chart or graph is used to support your conclusion and is referenced and incorporated into the discussion.  Demonstrate thorough research with at least 6 sources of your own that are identified in a Works Cited list.   Research includes the use of statistics and data analysis as well as personal experiences/opinions to make connections to self, to text, and to the world.  

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Parallel Structure Parallel structure adds both clout and clarity to your writing. When you use parallel structure, you increase the readability of your writing by creating word patterns readers can follow easily. Understanding Parallel Structure Parallel structure (also called parallelism) is the repetition of a chosen grammatical form within a sentence. By making each compared item or idea in your sentence follow the same grammatical pattern, you create a parallel construction. Example Not Parallel: Ellen likes hiking, the rodeo, and to take afternoon naps Parallel: Ellen likes hiking, attending the rodeo, and taking afternoon naps. OR Ellen likes to hike, attend the rodeo, and take afternoon naps. Using Parallel Structure With Coordinating Conjunctions When you connect two or more clauses or phrases with a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yer, or so), use parallel structure. Example Not Parallel: My best friend took me dancing and to a show. Parallel: My best friend took me to a dance and a show. With Correlative Conjunctions When you connect two clauses or phrases with a correlative conjunction (not only…but also, either…or. neither…nor, if…then, etc.), use parallel structure. Example Not Parallel: My dog not only likes to play fetch, but also chase cars. Parallel: My dog not only likes to play fetch, but he also likes to chase cars. OR My dog likes not only to play fetch, but also to chase cars. With Phrases or Clauses of Comparison When you connect two clauses or phrases with a word of comparison, such as than or as, use parallel structure. Example Not Parallel: I would rather pay for my education than financial aid Parallel: I would rather pay for my education than receive financial aid

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