Critic M. Ann Hall writes, Now we need to focus on sport as a site for relations of domination…

Critic M. Ann Hall writes, Now we need to focus on sport as a site for relations of domination…

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Critic M. Ann Hall writes, “Now we need to focus on sport as a site for relations of domination
and subordination (gender, race, class, sexuality, and other forms) and on how sport serves as
a site of resistance and transformation.”
Writers are often credited with being among society’s toughest social, political and
cultural critics. Comparing and contrasting two texts from the reading list and using at
least one secondary source to support your argument, write a 1200-1500 word essay in
response to ONE of the following questions. Note that the series of questions below offer
you some options for comparing the texts, but you won’t necessarily answer every
question; you will need to find your own focus in the essay.
1. Discuss the ways in which two texts on the reading list represent gender, race,
OR class in sport. What are the effects of these representations? What techniques
do the authors use to explore these tensions? Does sport serve as a site of
resistance or transformation in these texts? How? How does each text operate
within its genre, and what are the limits or benefits of that genre? When
formulating your response to these questions, try to use the appropriate keywords
we have discussed so far this semester.
2. Compare and contrast the ways in which at least two authors from the reading list
represent the coming-of-age process in their texts. What role does sport play in
this process and why have the authors chosen to use sport to explore this journey?
What might the components in the story symbolize in the coming-of-age process
beyond the story itself? How does each text operate within its genre, and what are
the limits or benefits of that genre? When formulating your response to these
questions, try to use the appropriate keywords we have discussed so far this
semester.
Once you’ve selected your topic and performed an in-depth examination of two texts
from the reading list (novel, poetry, short stories, or play), find at least one secondary
source to support your argument.
Your essay should respond to the question by providing an interpretation or close reading of
the texts. This topic is framed broadly enough that it requires you to formulate your own
specific argument. Please do not exceed the word limit and be sure to include in-text citations
and a works cited page consistent with MLA style guidelines.
Keep in mind that this essay is analytical. Therefore, your thesis should be persuasive
(but arguable), and your essay should be driven by analysis (subsequent claims and evidence). Remember that the purpose of this essay is not to merely summarize (simply
report what the stories are about) or to write about some idea in general, but to critically
consider how some idea is represented in two particular texts, through an analysis of the
specific literary techniques the authors use.
Choose specific quotes and examples from the text that are relevant to your claims and
use them in service of supporting these ideas. Remember that each quote/example should
be introduced, explained/analyzed, and relevant (and cited).
Due Dates and Steps:
Note that these steps may overlap.
Step 1: Choose a topic from one of the selections above and the two texts you will
address in your essay.
Step 2: Brainstorm.
Generate ideas by brainstorming responses to questions such as the following:
1) How do the two texts represent the topic in a similar way? How do they
differ or diverge in their representation?
2) What is the debate or discussion around your topic? What sources will
help you learn more about your topic?
To brainstorm, you may consider freewriting for five to ten minutes using hand-
written notes or a Word document, or drawing a mind map or a Venn diagram,
among other techniques. Use a strategy that works for you.
Step 3: Preliminary research
You must use at least one reputable/academic source in your essay. The essay
must present a clear, thesis-based argument that aims to persuade your reader of
your point-of-view, and you must use all of your sources responsibly and honestly
in order to develop your own argument.
In selecting your source(s), be sure to accurately and correctly trace the origins of
each source to an academic or institutional framework (eg an academic journal, a
provincial/national/international magazine or newspaper, a government website or
publication etc.), and cite them fully and clearly throughout the paper in order to
support or contextualize your own argument and writing.
Step 4: Proposal & Outline. Submit a PDF of your outline by Monday, March 22nd, 11:59
PDT.
1) Examine the sample essay outline posted on Moodle. Use it as a model for
your outline.
2) Your Proposal and Outline should include:
a) A clear, specific thesis statement that establishes your position on the topic.
b) A complete topic sentence for each body paragraph, followed by a
point-form outline of the paragraph (3-4 points/paragraph).
c) A list of citations (formatted according to MLA standards) of both the
primary sources (the two texts you’re comparing) and the secondary
source(s) you are considering using. For the secondary source(s) (Le
texts you find during the research process), please include a brief
summary of the text and a 1-2 sentence explanation of how you
anticipate this text will be useful in your essay. Each annotation should
be 2-5 sentences in total.
Step 5: First Draft
1) When writing, consider the structure of a comparison-contrast essay.
2) Integrate both evidence from the two primary texts you’re comparing and
the secondary source(s) you found during your research.
Step 6: Revise.
1) Taking the feedback from your peers and instructor into account, rewrite
and revise your essay as necessary to implement the feedback you
received in the workshop and to ensure that you are meeting all of the
requirements for this assignment.
2) Edit your essay for clear and complete sentences, correct grammar, and
concise word choice (read your sentences in reverse order to focus on each
one individually).
3) Consider proofreading your essay in a hard copy format. This will help
you catch any typos and other errors that you may have missed while
reading on the screen.
Step 7: Submit a PDF of your final draft by April 6th, 11:59 PDT.
Requirements:
1. Your essay must be 1200-1500 words (not including in-text citations or Works
Cited) in 12 pt. Time New Roman, double-spaced font.
2. You should format the essay according to MLA standards (document and citation
format).
3. Quotations and paraphrases must be correctly cited. Any form of plagiarism will
result in serious consequences.
Your essay must incorporate at least one reliable, authoritative source. In addition to
peer-reviewed articles from academic journals, you may use articles from reputable
sources such as the newspapers The Guardian, The New York Times, or The Globe and
Mail; magazines such as Time, The Wairus, or National Geographic; and websites such
as The Conversation. This assignment will serve as the foundation for your longer Final Essay due on April 6th
Steps to follow:
1. Read the instructions for the Final Essay carefully and thoroughly.
2. Do some pre-writing and select the topic and texts you will use in your analysis.
3. Perform a thorough close reading of the texts, noting both similarities and differences
between them.
4. Do some research and find at least one scholarly secondary text that you will use to
support your argument.
5. Structure what you want to say into manageable compartments/categories/topics.
6. Articulate a specific thesis statement that is both an argument and a roadmap.
7. Organize and plan corresponding paragraphs and the development of the argument.
Your Proposal and Outline should include:

a clear, specific thesis statement that establishes your position on the topic.
a complete topic sentence for each body paragraph, followed by a point-form
outline of the paragraph (3-4 points/paragraph).
a brief Bibliography that includes citations of ALL texts, including secondary
source(s), that you plan to use. For the secondary source(s) (i.e. texts you find
during the research process), please include a brief summary of the text and a 1
2 sentence explanation of how you anticipate this text will be useful in your essay.

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