Consider the following implementation of Dijkstra’s algorithm: vector graph: :get_distances (node_t source) const { vector distances (neighbors.size(), infinity); typedef…

Consider the following implementation of Dijkstra’s algorithm: vector graph: :get_distances (node_t source) const { vector distances (neighbors.size(), infinity); typedef…

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Consider the following implementation of Dijkstra’s algorithm:
vector graph: :get_distances (node_t source) const {
vector distances (neighbors.size(), infinity);
typedef pair q_entry;
}
priority_queue, greater> q;
distances [source] = 0;
q.push (make_pair (0, source));
while (!q. empty()) {
q_entry next = q.top(); q.pop();
if (next.first > distances [next.second])
continue;
for (neighbor n: neighbors [next.second]) {
distance_t new_dist = next.first + n.distance;
if (new_dist < distances [n.node]) { distances [n.node] = new_dist; q.push (make_pair (new_dist, n. node)); } } return distances; Consider further the following graph, which contains edges with negative weights, and more nodes and edges than shown, repeating the pattern: 99 -98 99 -98 99 -98 What will happen when running Dijkstra's algorithm starting from node A? Expert Answer: Answer rating: 100% (QA) It seems like there s a snippet of code provided that represents an implementation of Dijkstra s alg View the full answer