MGT 422 SEU Business Ethics and Organization Social Responsibility Worksheet

Description


Assignment 3
Business Ethics and Organization Social
Responsibility (MGT 422)
Learning Outcomes:
No
Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)
CLO-4
Illustrate the role of social responsibility in the functional areas and strategic
processes of business and a comprehensive framework for analysing and resolving
ethical issues and dilemmas in an organization.
CLO-6
Write coherent project about a case study or actual research about ethics.
Critical Thinking
Students could select two companies from the Global 100 and compare how various companies
approach the subject of social responsibility. Students could investigate 2 companies and prepare
a report.
The Global 100 is a group based in Canada that rates companies globally on a sustainability
index: http://www.global100.org/

The 100 most sustainable corporations of 2022


Pointers for student’s referenceReport must include*Introduction (250 words-2 Marks)
*Identify its key stakeholders (350 words-3 Marks)
*Critically analyse its CSR report (500 words- 4 Marks)
*Conclusion (150 words- 1 Mark)
Basic requirement for the Assignment


Title is compulsory
Peer reviewed journals and References should be used to support your submission
Note for students: Only covering these pointers for the essay will not guarantee
awarding of full marks, please do your research well and include other content
too. These pointers are just to guide you.
Instructions for preparing the Assignment:
All students are encouraged to use their own words.
Use Saudi Electronic University academic writing standards and APA style
guidelines.
Use proper referencing (APA style) to reference, other styles will not be accepted.
Support your submission with course material concepts, principles, and theories
from the textbook and at least two scholarly, peer-reviewed journal articles unless
the assignment calls for more.
It is strongly encouraged that you submit all assignments into the safe assignment
Originality Check prior to submitting it to your instructor for grading and review
the grading rubric to understand how you will be graded for this assignment.
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MANAGING BUSINESS ETHICS
Straight Talk About How To Do It Right
Fifth Edition
LINDA KLEBE TREVIÑO
Distinguished Professor of Organizational Behavior and Ethics
Smeal College of Business
The Pennsylvania State University
KATHERINE A. NELSON
Lecturer
Fox School of Business
Temple University
JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC.
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Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Treviño, Linda Klebe.
Managing business ethics : straight talk about how to do it right / Linda Klebe Treviño, Katherine
A. Nelson. – 5th ed.
p. cm.
Includes index.
ISBN 978-0-470-34394-4 (pbk.)
1. Business ethics. 2. Business ethics–Case studies. I. Nelson, Katherine A. II. Title.
HF5387.T734 2010
1740 .4–dc22
2010020659
Printed in the United States of America
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
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BRIEF CONTENTS
SECTION I
CHAPTER 1
SECTION II
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCING STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT MANAGING
BUSINESS ETHICS: WHERE WE’RE GOING AND WHY
2
ETHICS AND THE INDIVIDUAL
DECIDING WHAT’S RIGHT:
A PRESCRIPTIVE APPROACH
38
DECIDING WHAT’S RIGHT:
A PSYCHOLOGICAL APPROACH
71
ADDRESSING INDIVIDUALS’
COMMON ETHICAL PROBLEMS
111
SECTION III MANAGING ETHICS IN THE ORGANIZATION
CHAPTER 5
ETHICS AS ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
CHAPTER 6
MANAGING ETHICS AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE
CHAPTER 7
MANAGING FOR ETHICAL CONDUCT
CHAPTER 8
ETHICAL PROBLEMS OF MANAGERS
150
207
255
292
SECTION IV ORGANIZATIONAL ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
CHAPTER 9
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
322
CHAPTER 10 ETHICAL PROBLEMS OF ORGANIZATIONS 354
CHAPTER 11 MANAGING FOR ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
IN A GLOBAL BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
INDEX
399
449
iii
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CONTENTS
PREFACE
XIII
SECTION I
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCING STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT MANAGING
BUSINESS ETHICS: WHERE WE’RE GOING AND WHY
Introduction 2
The Financial Disaster of 2008 4
Borrowing Was Cheap 4
Real Estate Became the Investment of Choice 5
Mortgage Originators Peddled ‘‘Liar Loans’’ 5
Banks Securitized the Poison and Spread It Around 6
Those Who Were Supposed to Protect Us Didn’t 7
Moving Beyond Cynicism 9
Can Business Ethics Be Taught 13
Aren’t Bad Apples the Cause of Ethical Problems in Organizations? 13
Shouldn’t Employees Already Know the Difference between Right and Wrong?
Aren’t Adults’ Ethics Fully Formed and Unchangeable? 16
This Book is about Managing Ethics in Business 19
Ethics and the Law 20
Why Be Ethical? Why Bother? Who Cares? 21
Individuals Care about Ethics: The Motivation to be Ethical 21
Employees Care about Ethics Employee Attraction and Commitment 23
Managers Care about Ethics 23
Executive Leaders Care about Ethics 24
Industries Care about Ethics 26
Society Cares about Ethics: Business and Social Responsibility 27
The Importance of Trust 27
The Importance of Values 29
How the Book is Structured 30
Conclusion 32
Discussion Questions 32
2
15
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CONTENTS
Exercise: Your Cynicism Quotient
Notes 34
33
SECTION II
ETHICS AND THE INDIVIDUAL
CHAPTER 2
DECIDING WHAT’S RIGHT:
A PRESCRIPTIVE APPROACH
38
Introduction 38
Ethical Dilemmas 38
Prescriptive Approaches to Ethical Decision Making in Business 39
Focus on Consequences (Consequentialist Theories) 40
Focus on Duties, Obligations, and Principles (Deontological Theories)
Focus on Integrity (Virtue Ethics) 46
Eight Steps to Sound Ethical Decision Making in Business 52
Step One: Gather the Facts 52
Step Two: Define the Ethical Issues 52
Step Three: Identify the Affected Parties (the Stakeholders) 53
Step Four: Identify the Consequences 54
Step Five: Identify the Obligations 56
Step Six: Consider Your Character and Integrity 56
Step Seven: Think Creatively about Potential Actions 57
Step Eight: Check Your Gut 58
Practical Preventive Medicine 58
Doing Your Homework 58
When You’re Asked to Make a Snap Decision 59
Conclusion 61
Discussion Questions 62
Exercise: Clarifying Your Values 63
Case: Pinto Fires 64
Notes 69
CHAPTER 3
DECIDING WHAT’S RIGHT:
A PSYCHOLOGICAL APPROACH
71
Introduction 71
Ethical Awareness and Ethical Judgment 71
Individual Differences, Ethical Judgment, and Ethical Behavior
Ethical Decision-Making Style 76
Cognitive Moral Development 77
Locus of Control 84
Machiavellianism 85
75
42
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CONTENTS
Moral Disengagement 86
Facilitators of and Barriers to Good Ethical Judgment 88
Thinking about Fact Gathering 88
Thinking about Consequences 89
Thinking about Integrity 91
Thinking about Your Gut 93
Unconscious Biases 94
Emotions in Ethical Decision Making 95
Toward Ethical Action 97
Revisiting the Pinto Fires Case: Script Processing and Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cost-Benefit Analysis 103
Conclusion 105
Exercise: Understanding Cognitive Moral Development 105
Discussion Questions 106
Notes 107
CHAPTER 4
ADDRESSING INDIVIDUALS’ COMMON
ETHICAL PROBLEMS 111
Introduction 111
Identifying Your Values—and Voicing Them 112
People Issues 114
Discrimination 115
Harassment, Sexual and Otherwise 119
Conflicts of Interest 122
What Is It? 123
How We Can Think about This Issue 125
Why Is It an Ethical Problem? 126
Costs 126
Customer Confidence Issues 127
What Is It? 127
How We Can Think about This Issue 131
Why Is It an Ethical Problem? 131
Costs 131
Use of Corporate Resources 132
What Is It? 132
How We Can Think about This Issue 136
Why Is It an Ethical Problem? 136
Costs 136
When All Else Fails: Blowing the Whistle 137
When Do You Blow the Whistle? 139
How to Blow the Whistle 140
Conclusion 145
Discussion Questions 145
Notes 147
102
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CONTENTS
SECTION III
MANAGING ETHICS IN THE ORGANIZATION
CHAPTER 5
ETHICS AS ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
150
Introduction 150
Organizational Ethics as Culture 151
What Is Culture? 151
Strong versus Weak Cultures 151
How Culture Influences Behavior: Socialization and Internalization 152
Ethical Culture: A Multisystem Framework 153
Alignment of Ethical Culture Systems 154
Ethical Leadership 156
Executive Leaders Create Culture 156
Leaders Maintain or Change Organizational Culture 157
Other Formal Cultural Systems 166
Selection Systems 166
Values and Mission Statements 168
Policies and Codes 169
Orientation and Training Programs 171
Performance Management Systems 172
Organizational Authority Structure 175
Decision-Making Processes 178
Informal Cultural Systems 180
Role Models and Heroes 180
Norms: ‘‘The Way We Do Things around Here’’ 182
Rituals 182
Myths and Stories 183
Language 185
Organizational Climates: Fairness, Benevolence, Self-Interest, Principles 187
Developing and Changing the Ethical Culture 188
How an Ethical Culture Can Become an Unethical Culture 189
Becoming a More Ethical Culture 190
A Cultural Approach to Changing Organizational Ethics 192
Audit of the Ethical Culture 193
A Cultural Systems View 193
A Long-Term View 194
Assumptions about People 194
Diagnosis: The Ethical Culture Audit 194
Ethical Culture Change Intervention 196
The Ethics of Managing Organizational Ethics 198
Conclusion 198
Discussion Questions 198
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Case: Culture Change at Texaco 199
Case: An Unethical Culture in Need of Change: Tap Pharmaceuticals
Notes 203
CHAPTER 6
201
MANAGING ETHICS AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE
207
Introduction 207
Structuring Ethics Management 208
Making Ethics Comprehensive and Holistic 210
Managing Ethics: The Corporate Ethics Office 211
Ethics and Compliance Officers 212
The Ethics Infrastructure 214
The Corporate Ethics Committee 215
Communicating Ethics 215
Basic Communications Principles 216
Evaluating the Current State of Ethics Communications 219
Multiple Communication Channels for Formal Ethics Communication 220
Interactive Approaches to Ethics Communication at USAA 222
Mission or Values Statements 224
Organizational Policy 226
Codes of Conduct 227
Communicating Senior Management Commitment to Ethics 227
Formal and Informal Systems to Resolve Questions and Report Ethical Concerns
Using the Reward System to Reinforce the Ethics Message 238
Evaluating the Ethics Program 239
Surveys 240
Values or Compliance Approaches 242
Globalizing An Ethics Program 243
Conclusion 245
Discussion Questions 245
Case: Improving an Ethical Culture at Georgia-Pacific 247
Appendix: How Fines Are Determined under the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines 252
Notes 253
CHAPTER 7
MANAGING FOR ETHICAL CONDUCT
255
Introduction 255
In Business, Ethics Is about Behavior 255
Practical Advice for Managers: Ethical Behavior 256
Our Multiple Ethical Selves 256
The Kenneth Lay Example 257
The Dennis Levine Example 259
Practical Advice for Managers: Multiple Ethical Selves 259
Rewards and Discipline 260
People Do What’s Rewarded and Avoid Doing What’s Punished 260
People Will Go the Extra Mile to Achieve Goals Set by Managers 261
235
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CONTENTS
How Goals Combined with Rewards Can Encourage Unethical Behavior
Practical Advice for Managers: Goals, Rewards and Discipline 263
Recognize the Power of Indirect Rewards and Punishments 264
Can Managers Really Reward Ethical Behavior? 266
What about the Role of Discipline? 267
Practical Advice for Managers: Discipline 269
‘‘Everyone’s Doing It’’ 270
People Follow Group Norms 270
Rationalizing Unethical Behavior 270
Pressure to Go Along 271
Practical Advice for Managers: Group Norms 271
People Fulfill Assigned Roles 272
The Zimbardo Prison Experiment 273
Roles at Work 274
Conflicting Roles Can Lead to Unethical Behavior 275
Roles Can Also Support Ethical Behavior 275
Practical Advice for Managers: Roles 276
People Do What They’re Told 276
The Milgram Experiments 277
Obedience to Authority at Work 279
Practical Advice for Managers: Obedience to Authority 279
Responsibility Is Diffused in Organizations 279
‘‘Don’t Worry—We’re Taking Care of Everything’’ 280
Diffusing Responsibility in Groups 280
Diffusing Responsibility by Dividing Responsibility 281
Diffusing Responsibility by Creating Psychological Distance 282
Practical Advice for Managers: Personal Responsibility 283
Conclusion 284
Discussion Questions 285
Case: Sears, Roebuck, and Co.: The Auto Center Scandal 285
Notes 289
CHAPTER 8
ETHICAL PROBLEMS OF MANAGERS
Introduction 292
Managers and Employee Engagement 292
Managing the ‘‘Basics’’ 295
Hiring and Work Assignments 295
Performance Evaluation 296
Discipline 299
Terminations 301
Why Are These Ethical Problems? 303
Costs 303
Managing a Diverse Workforce 304
Diversity 305
292
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Harassment 306
Family and Personal Issues 307
Why Are These Ethical Problems? 309
Costs 309
The Manager as a Lens 310
The Buck Stops with Managers 310
Managers Are Role Models 313
Managing Up and Across 314
Honesty Is Rule One 315
Standards Go Both Ways 315
Conclusion 316
Discussion Questions 317
Notes 318
SECTION IV
ORGANIZATIONAL ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
CHAPTER 9
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
322
Introduction 322
Why Corporate Social Responsibility? 322
Types of Corporate Social Responsibility 329
Economic Responsibilities 329
Legal Responsibilities 330
Ethical Responsibilities 330
Philanthropic Responsibilities 331
Triple Bottom Line and Environmental Sustainability 334
Is Socially Responsible Business Good Business? 337
The Benefit of a Good Reputation 338
Socially Responsible Investors Reward Social Responsibility 338
The Cost of Illegal Conduct 339
The Cost of Government Regulation 340
What the Research Says about Social Responsibility and Firm Performance
Being Socially Responsible Because It’s the Right Thing to Do 346
Conclusion 348
Discussion Questions 348
Case: Merck and River Blindness 349
Notes 351
CHAPTER 10 ETHICAL PROBLEMS OF ORGANIZATIONS
Introduction 354
Managing Stakeholders
355
354
343
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CONTENTS
Ethics and Consumers 356
Conflicts of Interest 357
Product Safety 365
Advertising 369
Ethics and Employees 373
Employee Safety 374
Employee Downsizings 378
Ethics and Shareholders 381
Ethics and the Community 386
Why Are These Ethical Issues 388
Costs 388
Conclusion 389
Discussion Questions 389
Notes 394
CHAPTER 11 MANAGING FOR ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT
399
Introduction 399
Focus on the Individual Expatriate Manager 400
The Difficulties of Foreign Business Assignments 400
The Need for Structure, Training, and Guidance 400
Foreign Language Proficiency 401
Learning about the Culture 401
Recognizing the Power of Selective Perception 403
Assumption of Behavioral Consistency 404
Assumption of Cultural Homogeneity 404
Assumption of Similarity 405
Ethics-Related Training and Guidance 405
How Different Are Ethical Standards in Different Cultures—Really? 411
Development of Corporate Guidelines and Policies for Global Business Ethics
The Organization in a Global Business Environment 417
Deciding to Do Business in a Foreign Country 417
Development of a Transcultural Corporate Ethic 425
Conclusion 429
Discussion Questions 429
Case: Selling Medical Ultrasound Technology in Asia 431
Case: Google Goes to China 434
Appendix: Caux Round Table Principles for Business 440
Notes 444
INDEX
449
413
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PREFACE
WHY DOES THE WORLD
NEED ANOTHER BUSINESS
ETHICS TEXT?
The popular business press is replete with feature stories describing ethical meltdowns and how those corporate misdeeds have eroded the public trust of business
leaders and their organizations. As most of us learned at our parents’ knees, trust and
reputation are built over many years and take but an instant to be destroyed. So here
we stand at a crossroads. Is it going to be business as usual for business? Or are businesspeople going to commit to regaining the trust of our peers, our families, and our
fellow citizens?
In response to this crisis of trust, universities across the country are scrambling
to design new courses that incorporate leadership, communication skills, the basics of
human resources management, and ethics. That’s why we wrote this book; we want
to make the study of ethics relevant to real-life work situations. We want to help
businesspeople regain the trust that’s been squandered in the last few years.
This book is different from other business ethics texts in several key ways: First,
it was written by an unusual team. Linda Trevi~no is Distinguished Professor of Organizational Behavior and Ethics in the Management and Organization Department of
the Smeal College of Business at the Pennsylvania State University. Her prolific research on the management of ethical conduct in organizations is published in the
field’s best journals and is internationally known and referenced. She has more than
20 years of experience in teaching students and executives in university and nonuniversity settings, and she also has experience as a corporate consultant and speaker
on ethics and management issues. Kate Nelson is a full-time faculty member at the
Fox School of Business at Temple University in Philadelphia, where she teaches
management, business ethics, and human resources to undergraduates. Before joining
Temple’s faculty, Kate worked for more than 30 years in strategic organizational
communication and human resources at a variety of companies including Citicorp,
Merrill Lynch, and Mercer HR Consulting. She also has worked as a consultant specializing in ethics and strategic employee communications and has designed ethics
programs for numerous organizations. We think that bringing together this diverse
mix of theory and practice makes the book unique.
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PREFACE
Second, the approach of this book is pragmatic, and that approach is a direct response to complaints and suggestions we have heard from students,
employees, and corporate executives. ‘‘Make it real,’’ they have said. ‘‘Tell us
what we need to know to effectively manage people. Take the mystery out of
this subject that seems so murky. Get to the point.’’ This book starts with the
assumption that ethics in organizations is about human behavior in those organizations. We believe that behavior results from a number of factors, many of
which can be influenced by managers and the organizations themselves. As a
result, this book is organized into sections about individuals, managing in organizational context, and organizations in their broader environment, the ethical
dilemmas managers face, and how they might solve them. It also features philosophical and psychological factors of decision making, ethical culture, how managers can influence employees’ behavior through ethical leadership, what
corporations are doing to encourage ethical behavior and corporate social responsibility, and international business ethics.
Third, we have used a different mix of examples than is found in conventional
business ethics texts. Most texts focus on high-level, corporate dilemmas: ‘‘Should
senior executives be paid at a particular level? Should this industry do business in
China? Should American environmental laws apply to American companies operating overseas?’’
Although these are interesting issues, the vast majority of students and
employees will never have to face them. However, they will have to hire, manage, assess performance, discipline, fire, and provide incentives for staff, as well
as produce quality products and services and deal effectively and fairly with
customers, vendors, and other stakeholders. As a result, although we do feature
some classic corporate ethics cases, many of the cases in this book center on the
kinds of problems that most people will encounter during the course of their
careers. All of the ‘‘hypothetical’’ cases in this text are based on actual incidents
that have happened somewhere—it’s the real stuff that goes on every day in
offices across the country.
Fourth, this book was developed with the help of students at a number of
universities and with guidance from numerous managers and senior executives
from various corporations and organizations. We have incorporated the latest research on ethics and organizational behavior into this text, and much of the material that appears within these pages has been tested in both university and
corporate settings.
Fifth, we believe this book is easy to use because it is organized to be flexible. It can be used alone to teach an ethics course, or it can be used as a supplement to a more conventional, philosophical text. The sections in this book
basically stand alone and can be taught in a different sequence than is presented
here, and the book also has many cases and vignettes you can use for class discussion. Wiley will create custom versions of the text with selected chapters if
requested to do so. To help teach this course, the instructor’s guide provides
resources such as outlines, overheads, discussion questions, and additional cases
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for class discussion; it also supplies references to many other resources that can
be used to teach the course.
A NOTE TO STUDENTS
This book was written for you. We have listened to your complaints and
your wish lists and have tried to pare this complicated subject down to a digestible size. The cases that appear in this book all happened to people just
like you, who were not as prepared to deal with the dilemmas as you will be
after taking this course. Before you get into this book, we have one suggestion:
know that regardless of how large an organization you find yourself in, you’re
not some little cog in a giant wheel. You have the power to change not only
your own behavior and knowledge of ethics but also the behavior and knowledge of the people you work with. Use that power: the job you save may be
your own.
We also want to suggest that when interviewing for your next job, you try to
make sure that you’re joining an organization that values ethics. Are ethics and values described in the firm’s recruiting materials? Do organizational representatives
talk about ethics and values during their interviews with you? When you ask about
how their organization demonstrates ethics and values, does your interviewer respond
enthusiastically, or does he or she look like a deer caught in headlights so you instantly know that he or she has never even considered this question before? It’s much
easier to get into an ethical organization in the first place than try to get out of an
unethical one later on.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
It takes a lot of work by a lot of people to make a project like this come together. We’ll begin with some joint thank-yous. Then, because this process has
been so meaningful for each of us, we will separately share our more personal
thanks.
We both offer our heartfelt appreciation to current and former executives
who helped us with this and previous editions, in particular, Larry Axline, Jeffrey Braun, Jacquelyn Brevard, Earnie Broughton, Steve Church, Frank Daly,
Srinivas Dixit, Ray Dravesky, Kent Druyvesteyn, Dennis Jorgensen, John
O’Byrne, Joe Paterno, Robert Paul, Jo Pease, Shirley Peterson, Vin Sarni, Carl
Skooglund, Nan Stout, Phil Tenney, and George Wratney. All shared their valuable time and advice, some of them on multiple occasions. Their wisdom can be
found throughout this book, but especially in Chapter 6. They helped bring the
subject of managing business ethics to life.
We also wish to thank Gary Weaver (University of Delaware) for being our
philosophy adviser for the first edition, and Dennis Gioia (Penn State faculty
member and dear friend) for sharing his Pinto fire case and especially his
reflections.
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PREFACE
John Wiley & Sons, Inc. is a fine publisher with a superb team. These people
encouraged, nudged, nudged, and nudged again. We have many Wiley people to
thank for helping to make this book a success.
The book’s past and present reviewers also contributed significantly to making
this a better book, and we thank them as well. We also thank our students and particularly Penn State undergraduate, MBA, and Executive MBA students who provide us
with excellent feedback and advice semester after semester.
SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGMENTS—FROM
LINDA K. TREVIIÑO
I have always wondered what makes people do especially good and bad things.
As the child of Holocaust survivors, I have a unique perspective on and curiosity about such issues. My parents and their families escaped Nazi Germany before Hitler began killing Jews en masse, but not before my maternal grandfather
was severely beaten and not before my fraternal grandfather was taken to a concentration camp (euphemistically referred to as a work camp at the time). My
father’s family received papers allowing them to emigrate from Germany to the
United States shortly before the war began (in spring 1939), allowing my grandfather to be released from the camp where he was being held. Both families
landed in New York, where they survived through sheer grit, perseverance, and
belief in the American dream. Although my family never dwelled on their experiences in Germany, I grew up with a special sensitivity and concern for equality
and fair treatment. I traveled to Germany with my dad and brother about 30
years ago. We visited the tiny towns where Mom and Dad were born and met
some wonderful German people who had helped them or at least tried to. I
walked through a German village holding hands with the elderly woman who
had been my maternal grandmother’s best friend and who urged the family to
leave Germany because she anticipated the worst. I met another elderly woman
who had cared for my father and aunt when they were children and who tried to
take care of their home when they were forced to leave everything behind.
These were special people, and the opportunity to connect with them holds a
special place in my heart. So my family and background influenced me in ways
I can’t fully grasp with my mind but in ways that I feel in my soul. And I know
that my quest to understand what makes people do good and bad things has
something to do with that influence.
Many special people have helped along the path that brought me to the writing of
this book. I’ll begin by thanking my mentors in the doctoral program at Texas A&M
University’s management department. Many thanks to Stuart Youngblood (now at
Texas Christian University), Don Hellriegel, Richard Woodman, Dick Daft (now at
Vanderbilt University), and Mary Zey, who encouraged my early theorizing and research in business ethics. They told me to go with my gut and to do what was important, and they supported my every step. My exceptional colleagues in the
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Management and Organizational Department at Penn State have also been supportive
all along the way. They have read my papers and challenged me to think harder and
make my work ever better.
My thanks also to the colleagues who have worked with me on ethics-related
research over the years and who have been partners in learning about the management of business ethics: particularly Gail Ball, Michael Brown, Ken Butterfield,
James Detert, David Harrison, Laura Hartman, Jennifer Kish Gephart, Don McCabe,
Bart Victor, Gary Weaver, and more. This shared learning has contributed to the
book in important ways.
Shortly after becoming a faculty member at Penn State, I had the good fortune to
meet my friend and coauthor, Kate Nelson. I was intrigued by a brief Wall Street
Journal article about Kate’s work at Citibank (you’ll read more about that later). We
met and became fast friends, who (believe it or not) loved talking about business
ethics. We decided to write an article together, and the rest, as Kate says, is history.
Kate brought the real world into this book. She was also willing to tell me when I was
getting too academic (not her words exactly). It became clearer and clearer to me that
we were supposed to write this book together, and I’m very glad we did. Thanks,
Kate!
The article became a book proposal that we first shared with publishers at the
Academy of Management meeting in 1992 (almost 20 years ago now). Shortly thereafter, Bill Oldsey (formerly publisher at John Wiley & Sons, Inc.) showed up in my
office at Penn State. His enthusiasm for the book was immediate and infectious, and
he talked us into writing a textbook rather than a trade book. I want to thank Bill for
the special part he played.
Over the years, Penn State colleagues, administrators, and donors have continued to support my efforts in the area of business ethics. I am grateful to the Cook
family, especially the late Ann Cook, for supporting business ethics at Smeal and the
Cook Fellowship that I held for a number of years. My thanks also to Mrs. Mercedes
Shoemaker (and her late husband, Albert) for supporting the Shoemaker program in
Business Ethics that has brought us wonderful speakers on the topic of business
ethics year after year. Finally, I am especially grateful to Dean James Thomas for
naming me Distinguished Professor of Organizational Behavior and Ethics.
My association with the Ethics Resource Center Fellows program (see www.
ethics.org) has connected me with executives who manage ethics in large business
organizations as well as consultants and those in government who are interested in
making the business world (and the rest of the world, for that matter) a more ethical
place. I appreciate the relationships and the learning that have come from this association as well as the time these executives have shared with me. In particular, I appreciate the funding that this group has provided for research that has found its way into
this book, especially research on executive ethical leadership.
My heartfelt thanks also go to family members, colleagues, and many dear
friends not only for cheering me on (as usual) but also for their many contributions to
this book. They have served as readers and interviewees. They have provided clipping services, helped me make contacts, and offered ideas for cases. They were there
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PREFACE
when I was overwhelmed. I can’t thank them enough. Finally, I thank the light of my
life, Dan, for the inspiration, love, and support he provides every day of my life and
for being one of the most ethical human beings I know.
SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGMENTS—FROM
KATHERINE A. NELSON
I began to learn about ethics and integrity as a very young child in a family where
‘‘doing it right’’ was the only option. I was blessed to grow up hearing about how
your reputation is priceless and you must always guard it and act in ways that
enhance that reputation. As a result, my biggest debt is to my parents, the late Harry
R. and Bernadette Prendergast Nelson (formerly of New Hartford, New York), and
my brother, James V. Nelson of Pasadena, California. My parents worked tirelessly
to set Jim

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