ECON 201 Saudi Electronic University Macroeconomics Worksheet

Description


College of Administrative and Financial Sciences
Assignment-2
Deadline: 06/08/2022 @ 23:59
Course Name: Macroeconomics
Student’s Name:Mohammed H Alossaimi
Course Code: ECON201
Student’s ID Number:180155564
Semester: I
CRN:
Academic Year: 1441/1442 H
For Instructor’s Use only
Instructor’s Name:
Students’ Grade:
/15
Level of Marks: High/Middle/Low
Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY

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poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

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pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).

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Assignment 2-Case Study-Chapters: 7, 8, 9 & 12
Case Study
When taxes induce people to change their behavior—such as inducing Jane to buy less pizza—the taxes cause
deadweight losses and make the allocation of resources less efficient. As we have already seen, much
government revenue comes from the individual income tax in many countries. In a case study in Chapter 8,
we discussed how this tax discourages people from working as hard as they otherwise might. Another
inefficiency caused by this tax is that it discourages people from saving.
Consider a person 25 years’ old who is considering saving $1,000. If he puts this money in a savings account
that earns 8 percent and leaves it there, he would have $21,720 when he retires at age 65. Yet if the
government taxes one-fourth of his interest income each year, the effective interest rate is only 6 percent.
After 40 years of earning 6 percent, the $1,000 grows to only $10,290, less than half of what it would have
been without taxation. Thus, because interest income is taxed, saving is much less attractive.
Some economists advocate eliminating the current tax system’s disincentive toward saving by changing the
basis of taxation. Rather than taxing the amount of income that people earn, the government could tax the
amount that people spend.
Under this proposal, all income that is saved would not be taxed until the saving is later spent. This alternative
system, called a consumption tax, would not distort people’s saving decisions.
Various provisions of the current tax code already make the tax system a bit like a consumption tax. Taxpayers
can put a limited amount of their saving into special accounts—such as Individual Retirement Accounts and
401(k) plans—that escape taxation until the money is withdrawn at retirement. For people who do most of
their saving through these retirement accounts, their tax bill is, in effect, based on their consumption rather
than their income.
European countries tend to rely more on consumption taxes than does the United States. Most of them raise
a significant amount of government revenue through a value-added tax, or a VAT. A VAT is like the retail sales
tax that many U.S. states use, but rather than collecting all of the tax at the retail level when the consumer
buys the final good, the government collects the tax in stages as the good is being produced (that is, as value
is added by firms along the chain of production). Various U.S. policymakers have proposed that the tax code
move further in direction of taxing consumption rather than income. In 2005, economist Alan Greenspan, then
Chairman of the Federal Reserve, offered this advice to a presidential commission on tax reform: “As you
know, many economists believe that a consumption tax would be best from the perspective of promoting
economic growth—particularly if one were designing a tax system from scratch—because a consumption tax
is likely to encourage saving and capital formation. However, getting from the current tax system to a
consumption tax raises a challenging set of transition issues.”
Q1: What should be taxed – Personal Income or Personal Consumption and why? Provide your opinion
based on the case given above. (Minimum 200 words).
[5 Marks]
Q2: How may it affect Saudi Economy if an income tax is imposed in KSA? (Min 200 words)?
[5 Marks]
Q3: In each of the following cases, determine how much GDP and each of its components is
affected?
[5 Marks]
A. Ahmad spends $300 to buy his dinner at the finest restaurant in Boston.
B. Abdul spends $1500 on a new laptop to use it in his software company in KSA. The laptop
was built in China.
C. Jane spends $1200 on a computer to use in her editing business. She got last year’s model on
sale for a great price from a local manufacturer.
D. General Motors builds $500 million worth of cars, but consumers only buy $470 million
worth of them.
N. Gregory Mankiw
Principles of
Macroeconomics
Sixth Edition
7
Consumers, Producers, and
the Efficiency of Markets
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Premium
PowerPoint
Slides by
Ron Cronovich
In this chapter,
look for the answers to these questions:
• What is consumer surplus? How is it related to
the demand curve?
• What is producer surplus? How is it related to
the supply curve?
• Do markets produce a desirable allocation of
resources? Or could the market outcome be
improved upon?
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Welfare Economics
▪ Recall, the allocation of resources refers to:
▪ how much of each good is produced
▪ which producers produce it
▪ which consumers consume it
▪ Welfare economics studies how the allocation
of resources affects economic well-being.
▪ First, we look at the well-being of consumers.
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Willingness to Pay (WTP)
A buyer’s willingness to pay for a good is the
maximum amount the buyer will pay for that good.
WTP measures how much the buyer values the good.
name
WTP
Anthony $250
Chad
175
Flea
300
John
125
Example:
4 buyers’ WTP
for an iPod
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WTP and the Demand Curve
Q: If price of iPod is $200, who will buy an iPod, and
what is quantity demanded?
A: Anthony & Flea will buy an iPod,
Chad & John will not.
name
WTP
Anthony $250
Chad
175
Flea
300
John
125
Hence, Qd = 2
when P = $200.
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WTP and the Demand Curve
Derive the
demand
schedule:
P (price
of iPod)
who buys
Qd
$301 & up nobody
0
251 – 300 Flea
1
Anthony $250
176 – 250 Anthony, Flea
2
Chad
175
3
Flea
300
Chad, Anthony,
126 – 175
Flea
125
John, Chad,
0 – 125
Anthony, Flea
4
name
John
WTP
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WTP and the Demand Curve
P
Q
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P
Qd
$301 & up
0
251 – 300
1
176 – 250
2
126 – 175
3
0 – 125
4
About the Staircase Shape…
P
This D curve looks like a staircase
with 4 steps – one per buyer.
If there were a huge # of buyers,
as in a competitive market,
there would be a huge #
of very tiny steps,
and it would look
more like a smooth
curve.
Q
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WTP and the Demand Curve
P
Flea’s WTP
Anthony’s WTP
Chad’s WTP
John’s
WTP
Q
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At any Q,
the height of
the D curve is
the WTP of the
marginal buyer,
the buyer who
would leave the
market if P were
any higher.
Consumer Surplus (CS)
Consumer surplus is the amount a buyer is willing
to pay minus the amount the buyer actually pays:
CS = WTP – P
name
WTP
Anthony $250
Suppose P = $260.
Flea’s CS = $300 – 260 = $40.
Chad
175
Flea
300
The others get no CS because
they do not buy an iPod at this
price.
John
125
Total CS = $40.
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CS and the Demand Curve
P
P = $260
Flea’s WTP
Flea’s CS =
$300 – 260 = $40
Total CS = $40
Q
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CS and the Demand Curve
P
Flea’s WTP
Anthony’s WTP
Instead, suppose
P = $220
Flea’s CS =
$300 – 220 = $80
Anthony’s CS =
$250 – 220 = $30
Total CS = $110
Q
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CS and the Demand Curve
P
The lesson:
Total CS equals
the area under
the demand curve
above the price,
from 0 to Q.
Q
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CS with Lots of Buyers & a Smooth D Curve
At Q = 5(thousand),
Price
the marginal buyer
per pair
$
is willing to pay $50
for pair of shoes.
P
The demand for shoes
Suppose P = $30.
Then his consumer
surplus = $20.
1000s of pairs
of shoes
D
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Q
CS with Lots of Buyers & a Smooth D Curve
CS is the area b/w
P and the D curve,
from 0 to Q.
Recall: area of
a triangle equals
½ x base x height
P
The demand for shoes
$
h
Height =
$60 – 30 = $30.
So,
CS = ½ x 15 x $30
= $225.
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D
Q
How a Higher Price Reduces CS
If P rises to $40,
CS = ½ x 10 x $20
= $100.
P
Two reasons for the
fall in CS.
2. Fall in CS due to
remaining buyers
paying higher P
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1. Fall in CS
due to buyers
leaving market
D
Q
ACTIVE LEARNING
1
Consumer surplus
A. Find marginal
buyer’s WTP at
Q = 10.
P
demand curve
$
B. Find CS for
P = $30.
Suppose P falls to $20.
How much will CS
increase due to…
C. buyers entering
the market
D. existing buyers
paying lower price
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Q
ACTIVE LEARNING
Answers
1
A. At Q = 10, marginal
$
buyer’s WTP is $30.
P
demand curve
B. CS = ½ x 10 x $10
= $50
P falls to $20.
C. CS for the
additional buyers
= ½ x 10 x $10 = $50
D. Increase in CS
on initial 10 units
= 10 x $10 = $100
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Q
Cost and the Supply Curve
▪ Cost is the value of everything a seller must give
up to produce a good (i.e., opportunity cost).
▪ Includes cost of all resources used to produce
good, including value of the seller’s time.
▪ Example: Costs of 3 sellers in the lawn-cutting
business.
A seller will produce and sell
name cost
the good/service only if the
Jack
$10
price exceeds his or her cost.
Janet
20
Hence, cost is a measure of
Chrissy
35
willingness to sell.
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Cost and the Supply Curve
Derive the supply schedule
from the cost data:
name
P
Qs
$0 – 9
0
10 – 19
1
20 – 34
2
35 & up
3
cost
Jack
$10
Janet
20
Chrissy
35
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Cost and the Supply Curve
P
Q
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P
Qs
$0 – 9
0
10 – 19
1
20 – 34
2
35 & up
3
Cost and the Supply Curve
P
Chrissy’s
cost
Janet’s
cost
Jack’s cost
Q
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At each Q,
the height of
the S curve
is the cost of the
marginal seller,
the seller who
would leave
the market if
the price were
any lower.
Producer Surplus
PS = P – cost
P
Producer surplus (PS):
the amount a seller
is paid for a good
minus the seller’s cost
Q
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Producer Surplus and the S Curve
PS = P – cost
P
Chrissy’s
cost
Jack’s PS = $15
Janet’s PS = $5
Janet’s
cost
Chrissy’s PS = $0
Total PS = $20
Jack’s cost
Q
Suppose P = $25.
Total PS equals the
area above the supply
curve under the price,
from 0 to Q.
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PS with Lots of Sellers & a Smooth S Curve
Suppose P = $40.
Price
per pair
At Q = 15(thousand),
P
The supply of shoes
the marginal seller’s
cost is $30,
S
and her producer
surplus is $10.
1000s of pairs
of shoes
Q
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PS with Lots of Sellers & a Smooth S Curve
PS is the area b/w
P and the S curve,
from 0 to Q.
P
The supply of shoes
S
The height of this
triangle is
$40 – 15 = $25.
So,
PS = ½ x b x h
= ½ x 25 x $25
= $312.50
h
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Q
How a Lower Price Reduces PS
If P falls to $30,
PS = ½ x 15 x $15
= $112.50
P
1. Fall in PS
due to sellers
leaving market
S
Two reasons for
the fall in PS.
2. Fall in PS due to
remaining sellers
getting lower P
Q
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ACTIVE LEARNING
2
Producer surplus
A. Find marginal
seller’s cost
at Q = 10.
P
supply curve
B. Find total PS for
P = $20.
Suppose P rises to $30.
Find the increase
in PS due to:
C. selling 5
additional units
D. getting a higher price
on the initial 10 units
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Cengage
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Q
ACTIVE LEARNING
Answers
2
P
supply curve
A. At Q = 10,
marginal cost = $20
B. PS = ½ x 10 x $20
= $100
P rises to $30.
C. PS on
additional units
= ½ x 5 x $10 = $25
D. Increase in PS
on initial 10 units
= 10 x $10 = $100
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Cengage
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Q
CS, PS, and Total Surplus
CS = (value to buyers) – (amount paid by buyers)
= buyers’ gains from participating in the market
PS = (amount received by sellers) – (cost to sellers)
= sellers’ gains from participating in the market
Total surplus = CS + PS
= total gains from trade in a market
= (value to buyers) – (cost to sellers)
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The Market’s Allocation of Resources
▪ In a market economy, the allocation of resources
is decentralized, determined by the interactions
of many self-interested buyers and sellers.
▪ Is the market’s allocation of resources desirable?
Or would a different allocation of resources make
society better off?
▪ To answer this, we use total surplus as a measure
of society’s well-being, and we consider whether
the market’s allocation is efficient.
(Policymakers also care about equality, though our
focus here is on efficiency.)
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Efficiency
Total
= (value to buyers) – (cost to sellers)
surplus
An allocation of resources is efficient if it maximizes
total surplus. Efficiency means:
▪ The goods are consumed by the buyers who
value them most highly.
▪ The goods are produced by the producers with the
lowest costs.
▪ Raising or lowering the quantity of a good
would not increase total surplus.
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Evaluating the Market Equilibrium
Market eq’m:
P = $30
Q = 15,000
P
S
Total surplus
= CS + PS
CS
Is the market eq’m
efficient?
PS
D
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Q
Which Buyers Consume the Good?
Every buyer
whose WTP is
≥ $30 will buy.
P
S
Every buyer
whose WTP is
< $30 will not.
So, the buyers
who value the
good most highly
are the ones who
consume it.
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D
Q
Which Sellers Produce the Good?
Every seller whose
cost is ≤ $30 will
produce the good.
P
S
Every seller whose
cost is > $30 will
not.
So, the sellers with
the lowest cost
produce the good.
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D
Q
Does Eq’m Q Maximize Total Surplus?
At Q = 20,
cost of producing
the marginal unit
is $35
P
S
value to consumers
of the marginal unit
is only $20
Hence, can increase
total surplus
by reducing Q.
This is true at any Q
greater than 15.
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D
Q
Does Eq’m Q Maximize Total Surplus?
At Q = 10,
cost of producing
the marginal unit
is $25
P
S
value to consumers
of the marginal unit
is $40
Hence, can increase
total surplus
by increasing Q.
This is true at any Q
less than 15.
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D
Q
Does Eq’m Q Maximize Total Surplus?
The market
eq’m quantity
maximizes
total surplus:
At any other
quantity,
can increase
total surplus by
moving toward
the market eq’m
quantity.
P
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S
D
Q
Adam Smith and the Invisible Hand
Passages from The Wealth of Nations, 1776
Adam Smith,
1723-1790
―Man has almost constant occasion
for the help of his brethren, and it is
vain for him to expect it from their
benevolence only. He will be more
likely to prevail if he can interest their
self-love in his favor, and show them
that it is for their own advantage to do
for him what he requires of them…
It is not from the benevolence of the
butcher, the brewer, or the baker that
we expect our dinner, but from their
regard to their own interest….
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Adam Smith and the Invisible Hand
Passages from The Wealth of Nations, 1776
Adam Smith,
1723-1790
―Every individual…neither intends to
promote the public interest, nor knows
how much he is promoting it….
He intends only his own gain, and he is
in this, as in many other cases, led by
an invisible hand to promote an end
which was no part of his intention.
Nor is it always the worse for the society
that it was no part of it. By pursuing his
own interest he frequently promotes
that of the society more effectually than
when he really intends to promote it.‖
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The Free Market vs. Govt Intervention
▪ The market equilibrium is efficient. No other
outcome achieves higher total surplus.
▪ Govt cannot raise total surplus by changing the
market’s allocation of resources.
▪ Laissez faire (French for ―allow them to do‖):
the notion that govt should not interfere with the
market.
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The Free Market vs. Central Planning
▪ Suppose resources were allocated not by the
market, but by a central planner who cares about
society’s well-being.
▪ To allocate resources efficiently and maximize total
surplus, the planner would need to know every
seller’s cost and every buyer’s WTP for every good
in the entire economy.
▪ This is impossible, and why centrally-planned
economies are never very efficient.
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CONCLUSION
▪ This chapter used welfare economics to
demonstrate one of the Ten Principles:
Markets are usually a good way to
organize economic activity.
▪ Important note:
We derived these lessons assuming
perfectly competitive markets.
▪ In other conditions we will study in later
chapters, the market may fail to allocate
resources efficiently…
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CONCLUSION
▪ Such market failures occur when:
▪ a buyer or seller has market power—the ability to
affect the market price.
▪ transactions have side effects, called externalities,
that affect bystanders. (example: pollution)
▪ We’ll use welfare economics to see how public policy
may improve on the market outcome in such cases.
▪ Despite the possibility of market failure, the analysis
in this chapter applies in many markets, and the
invisible hand remains extremely important.
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SUMMARY
• The height of the D curve reflects the value of the
good to buyers—their willingness to pay for it.
• Consumer surplus is the difference between what
buyers are willing to pay for a good and what they
actually pay.
• On the graph, consumer surplus is the area
between P and the D curve.
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SUMMARY
• The height of the S curve is sellers’ cost of
producing the good. Sellers are willing to sell if
the price they get is at least as high as their cost.
• Producer surplus is the difference between what
sellers receive for a good and their cost of
producing it.
• On the graph, producer surplus is the area
between P and the S curve.
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2012 Cengage
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May notMay
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except
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SUMMARY
• To measure society’s well-being, we use
total surplus, the sum of consumer and producer
surplus.
• Efficiency means that total surplus is maximized,
that the goods are produced by sellers with
lowest cost, and that they are consumed by
buyers who most value them.
• Under perfect competition, the market outcome
is efficient. Altering it would reduce total surplus.
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Cengage
2012 Cengage
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May notMay
be copied,
not be copied,
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N. Gregory Mankiw
Principles of
Macroeconomics
Sixth Edition
8
Application:
The Costs of Taxation
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Premium
PowerPoint
Slides by
Ron Cronovich
In this chapter,
look for the answers to these questions:
• How does a tax affect consumer surplus,
producer surplus, and total surplus?
• What is the deadweight loss of a tax?
• What factors determine the size of this
deadweight loss?
• How does tax revenue depend on the size of the
tax?
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permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
Review from Chapter 6
▪ A tax
▪ drives a wedge between the price buyers pay
and the price sellers receive.
▪ raises the price buyers pay and lowers the price
sellers receive.
▪ reduces the quantity bought & sold.
▪ These effects are the same

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